Big Band Bash

Nostalgia Ain’t What It Used To Be
by John Rayburn
$14.84
eBook

Publisher: History Publishing Company, LLC

Publication Date: June 26, 2018

ISBN: 9781940773575

Binding: Kobo eBook

Availability: eBook

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The big bands! An offshoot of jazz, reflected the soul of America before World War II, during it, and for a decade following it. Big bands played the music that brought romance, excitement and soothing streams of music to young America in the thirties, forties and late fifties. It was the music that fed the teenagers and the young adults too and soldiers, sailors and marines in World War II. Great singers like Bing Crosby, Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Jo Stafford, Helen O’Connell and a multitude of others had careers launched by bands like Harry James, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Xavier Cugat, Stan Kenton, Ray Anthony and Benny Goodman. They filled dance halls and dining rooms in major hotels across the country with dance music that filled hearts and feet that glided to dance numbers like the foxtrot then quickly prompted those feet to quicken with upbeat tempos into dances like the Lindy, Savoy and faster numbers called the jitterbug. During the War, the Big Bands and their singers were the connections between the GI’s in the foxholes, the sailors in the submarines. They brought solace and memories of loved ones and awakened determination to see them again. At home, big bands and singers like Jo Stafford, Helen O’Connell and Dinah Shore sent out love songs like You Belong to Me, I Cried For You and No Other Love to the boys on the battlefield to remind them that they are remembered at home and that special someone is waiting for their return. And when they did return, big band music was waiting for them and gave them a welcome with an outpouring of love and an upbeat of music that fed into the post war generation that went on to change music history in America. Big Band Bash fills its pages with the bands, singers, songs and music that made up the remarkable period in the American culture.