The Empire of the Crowned Slaves

by Henry Moa
$4.01
eBook

Publisher: Henry Moa

Publication Date: May 23, 2016

ISBN: 9781518666100

Binding: Kobo eBook

Availability: eBook

Get eBook

Roukn al-Din Baybars was born in 1223 in a Turkish tribe Kipchak installed in the Ukrainian Plains. He was captured by Mongolians horsemen and sold to a Russian slave trafficker who takes him to the city of La Tana, Venetian traderpost installed on the edge of the River named Don. There, he is bought at the slave market by a Venetian merchant who takes him in Syria where he is sold to an emir for the sum of 40 dinars.
The route of the slaves used two routes. The first passed through the Straits of the Bosporus and the Dardanelles, and then Constantinople. The other passed through Anatolia. It was in the town of Sivas was sold Baibars to the emir of the city of Aleppo.
He is incorporated in a school where young slaves are educated. At the end of his training, he joined the guard of the emir and the citadel where the Mamluks ensure its security. One day, he is spotted by the Sultan As-Salih Ayyub, who note his strength and his beauty and buys him to the Emir of Aleppo who may not refuse this request. He then joined the guard Mamluk of the Sultan and moved to Cairo.
In 1237, the Mongolians, who continue the conquests started by Genghis Khan, reach in Eastern Europe, which they plundered. In 1242, they leave in the countryside. This time, it will be the Middle East.
Meanwhile, the struggle between Christians and Muslims continues. In 1244, the Khwarezmians Turks take Jerusalem. The Pope called for a new crusade. Only the King of France Louis IX responds favorably. Convinced that the power of Islam lies in Egypt, he landed on the Egyptian coast and took the town of Damietta. On 20 November, the crusaders marched to Cairo. The two armies fight at Fariskour, near Mansoura. The Crusaders were defeated and the King of France is captured.
The Egyptian Sultan as-Salih Ayyub was dead 23 November 1249. His wife, Chaddar ad-Dour, ensures the Regency. Because the Christian enemy arrives and we must address this problem.