MOS Devices for Low-Voltage and Low-Energy Applications

by Yasuhisa Omura, Abhijit Mallik & Naoto Matsuo
$182.99
eBook

Publisher: Wiley

Series: Wiley - IEEE

Publication Date: December 28, 2016

ISBN: 9781119107385

Binding: Kobo eBook

Availability: eBook

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Helps readers understand the physics behind MOS devices for low-voltage and low-energy applications

  • Based on timely published and unpublished work written by expert authors
  • Discusses various promising MOS devices applicable to low-energy environmental and biomedical uses
  • Describes the physical effects (quantum, tunneling) of MOS devices
  • Demonstrates the performance of devices, helping readers to choose right devices applicable to an industrial or consumer environment
  • Addresses some Ge-based devices and other compound-material-based devices for high-frequency applications and future development of high performance devices.

"Seemingly innocuous everyday devices such as smartphones, tablets and services such as on-line gaming or internet keyword searches consume vast amounts of energy. Even when in standby mode, all these devices consume energy. The upcoming 'Internet of Things' (IoT) is expected to deploy 60 billion electronic devices spread out in our homes, cars and cities.

Britain is already consuming up to 16 per cent of all its power through internet use and this rate is doubling every four years. According to The UK's Daily Mail May (2015), if usage rates continue, all of Britain's power supply could be consumed by internet use in just 20 years. In 2013, U.S. data centers consumed an estimated 91 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity, corresponding to the power generated by seventeen 1000-megawatt nuclear power plants.  Data center electricity consumption is projected to increase to roughly 140 billion kilowatt-hours annually by 2020, the equivalent annual output of 50 nuclear power plants."
Natural Resources Defense Council, USA, Feb. 2015

All these examples stress the urgent need for developing electronic devices that consume as little energy as possible. The book “MOS Devices for Low-Voltage and Low-Energy ...