Historical Importance of Orion and Taurus to the Ancients

by Chris Boyd
$2.70
eBook

Publisher: Chris Boyd

Publication Date: June 11, 2015

ISBN: 9781310410048

Binding: Kobo eBook

Availability: eBook

Get eBook

I was convinced it would work. Point the device at the right star, and I would return to my home. I was standing outside the front of my house on a cold winters evening. The sky was ablaze with sparkling lights you could almost touch. I aimed the device and waited to be lifted up to the stars. I was excited, but also vaguely apprehensive of the journey ahead, after all I was only 3. Then, my father called me back into the house. I wasn’t to see the “device” again until I returned to my home town 12 years later, given to me by a man who had worked with my father. I suppose he had looked after it for me. He told me it was a gun sight. When you looked through the sight you could see a blurred red light and nothing much else. Perhaps that’s all it was.
I’ve poured over ancient texts and studied astronomical records all my life, looking for the star I suppose. If you want something enough, eventually you will find it and I believe I have, an orange star in between Taurus and Orion. The brightest of the group of 3 or 4 stars, 111 Tauri is barely visible to the naked eye. The nearby companion of interest, Gliese 201, requires a telescope to view it.

The start dates of our common male ancestor, the advent of civilization, the Egyptian king lists and the dates of creation myths from many cultures are similar. Is this just a coincidence? From the beginning man was enamoured with a certain region of the sky. Many clues point towards a star in that region. This book explores the path taken by the ancients and the evidence left of their origin.