Have You Planned Your Heart Attack

by Warrick Bishop
$20.25
eBook

Publisher: Warrick Bishop

Publication Date: August 31, 2016

ISBN: 9780646961286

Binding: Kobo eBook

Availability: eBook

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Have You Planned Your Heart Attack? is not the next optimistic, self-help, heart disease reversal, low carb, cure-all approach to health. Believing that prevention is better than cure, it presents a proactive approach to cardiac disease prevention. It is the first-of-its-kind, offering a balanced and referenced discussion of coronary risk assessment using modern technology. Taking a picture of the coronary arteries using CT to see the health of the arteries is not new; it just isn't being done routinely. Yet, by using these advances you can be ahead of the game about your own cardiovascular health. Wouldn’t you want to know, rather than guess, if the single biggest killer in the Western world was lurking inside of you?
We all know friends and family members who have suffered a heart attack, who live with angina or endure shortness of breath. A disease has developed. This book explores how we might be able to prevent the disease, especially a heart attack, from occurring in the first place.
Treatment for risk, prior to an event, is primary prevention – the focus of Have You Planned Your Heart Attack?.
Until recent times, primary prevention largely involved treatment of the unknown. Historically, risk assessment has been based on a number of factors observed in a population (or number of people). This observational data includes increasing age, being male, increased blood pressure and smoking. Now, today’s technology also allows us to look at the health of an individual’s coronary arteries in exquisite detail.
The use of CT imaging, before the onset of a problem, is a paradigm shift in the conventional management of heart disease.
Image information, combined with the information gained from the historically-used traditional risk factors, allow specialists, general practitioners and patients to be ahead of the development of coronary artery disease so that measures to reduce risk can be implemented.