Aggression

Clinical Features and Treatment Across the Diagnostic Spectrum
by Emil F. Coccaro, MD & Michael S. McCloskey, PhD
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Publisher: American Psychiatric Association Publishing

Publication Date: March 08, 2019

ISBN: 9781615372454

Binding: Kobo eBook

Availability: eBook

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Aggression: Clinical Features and Treatment Across the Diagnostic Spectrum addresses the role aggression plays in intermittent explosive disorder (IED), referred to as "primary aggression," and in a host of other psychiatric disorders -- from autism to posttraumatic stress. Aggression is a well-studied, multidimensional phenomenon that may be parsed by cognition, affect, and behavior. Occurring as primary aggression and as a symptom of other psychiatric disorders, aggression is both common and destructive -- of property, relationships, and the social order. The editors were instrumental in the development of the DSM classification for IED, and the book discusses the evolution of the diagnostic criteria from the 1950s to the current DSM-5. This long-range perspective informs the volume and provides a firm foundation for the clinical content, which is case-based and accessible. Moreover, each chapter is consistent in structure, moving from phenomenology to psychobiology to clinical approach and treatment. The book emphasizes that although abnormal psychobiological systems, including neurochemistry and neural circuits, may increase the risk of behavioral aggression, influences associated with genetics, epigenetics, and environmental forces are also extremely important, and these are discussed in-depth in each chapter.

Chapter topics were selected for their clinical relevance: Two chapters are devoted to primary aggression, first distinguishing form (verbal and physical) and type (direct or indirect); next, delineating the phenomenology, psychobiology, and comorbidities; and then exploring current treatment options, both psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic. Because aggression represents the most common reason for referral to psychiatric care in youth, most frequently in the context of disruptive behavioral disorders, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, the book devotes a chapter to these disorders, emphasizing ...